The World Politics Model

World Politics, otherwise known as world economics, refers to both the field which studies the economic and political patterns of the world as a whole and the regional field which studies the political relationships within those regions. In the middle of this field are the various processes of political globalisation as regards to issues of social equity. With the advent of the cold war, the world has not remained static since its inception; rather it has continuously fragmented into various bits and pieces. Today’s modern economies have no means of escape from the formidable economic turmoil, whereas in past decades people lived relatively peacefully as industrial growth was able to support their consumption. Today things are totally different; the rapid expansion of finance and technology have led to the decline of the worker’s wages; this phenomenon is epitomised by the rise of the ‘Service’ sector.

World Politics

This article will analyse the political theory of global economics and the global political implications that stem from such global trends. We shall discuss political theory and the notion of globalisation via the lenses of the World Politics. The World Politics is a field of study that studies international organisations and their impact on the domestic political mechanisms of various countries. Such theories can be applied economically as well as politically, to create a more democratic political system.

The World Politics requires fundamental knowledge on international relations because it deals with the promotion and protection of interests and the prevention of threats to those interests. The fundamental knowledge required for an understanding of world politics and its workings is the study of global economics. With globalization taking over every aspect of human interaction, it has become imperative that one develop a comprehensive analysis on the causes of international trade, political economy and the inter-relatedness of world politics and geo-political systems. Without going into the extensive details of global economics, suffice to say that it deals with the exchange of goods and services on the domestic and international markets.

Another essential facet of world politics is diplomacy. Diplomats are responsible for the maintenance of peace and stability in the world politics. They play a crucial role in resolving conflicts and dealing with other issues such as those relating to human rights, security, environment and globalization. In order to understand the intricacies of diplomacy, it is essential to have a clear understanding of world politics and how the powerful nations influence the rest of the world. International politics is also closely related to the domain of foreign policy.

The field of international relations is a complicated one and any student of world politics must therefore have a solid grounding in the vast field of academic and political science. Foreign policy refers to the interaction of states through diplomatic channels. Diplomats carry out statecraft through the use of diplomacy which involves the use of state power, including persuasion, to promote peace and stability within the polity they serve. A good student of world politics should therefore have an in depth knowledge of academic theory, good reading skills, and strong mathematical aptitude.

Studying world politics can be a daunting task for those who do not possess the necessary background. For this reason many colleges offer special programs that provide students with the expertise they need to tackle this dynamic field. International Studies Programs at George Warren University offer students the opportunity to participate in research-oriented units that help them develop both personal and professional skills that will greatly benefit their future careers. This comprehensive program not only provides students with an in depth understanding of world politics and its implications for today and tomorrow, but it also introduces students to a unique model of international relations and diplomacy.

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